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Issues, Strategies, and Perspectives in the Management of Disruptive Child Behavior in the Classroom

Hill M. Walker and Francine Holland
The Journal of Education
Vol. 161, No. 2, PROBLEM BEHAVIOR IN THE CLASSROOM (SPRING 1979), pp. 25-50
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42772974
Page Count: 26
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Issues, Strategies, and Perspectives in the Management of Disruptive Child Behavior in the Classroom
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Abstract

This paper focuses upon disruptive child behavior in the classroom. The goals of the paper are twofold: (a) to communicate knowledge and information regarding the dynamics of disruptive child behavior, and (b) to present practical, cost-effective behavior management strategies that teachers can use in remediating such behavior. Initially, the paper addresses the apparent trend toward an increase in both the frequency and the severity of child behavior problems occurring in the school setting. Possible reasons for this trend are presented, and our capacity as educators to respond to the challenge presented by it is discussed. In this section of the paper, factors relating to limitations in the educational setting which prevent or constrain the application of systematic behavior management procedures in the remediation of child behavior problems are also discussed. The main body of the paper deals with the following issues: (a) characteristics of disruptive child behavior in school; (b) teacher attempts to cope with disruptive child behavior; (c) strategies for remedying behavior problems in the classroom; (d) procedures for building in durability and generalization of treatment gains; and (e) limitations and ethical issues associated with the use of behavior management procedures. Behavior management procedures and strategies are presented in such a way, it is hoped, as to maximize their usage by classroom teachers. Considerable attention is given to the issues of practicality and cost-effectiveness in their application. The procedures presented and discussed are applicable in both regular and special classroom settings.

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