Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

THE EFFECTS OF EXTENDED WRITING ON STUDENTS' UNDERSTANDING OF CONTENT-AREA CONCEPTS

Christopher G. Hayes, Michele L. Simpson and Norman A. Stahl
Research and Teaching in Developmental Education
Vol. 10, No. 2 (Spring 1994), pp. 13-34
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42802462
Page Count: 22
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
THE EFFECTS OF EXTENDED WRITING ON STUDENTS' UNDERSTANDING OF CONTENT-AREA CONCEPTS
Preview not available

Abstract

This study compares two writing-based strategies designed to help at-risk college students become independent learners. The experimental strategy, PORPE, uses extended writing to teach students to Predict, Organize, Rehearse, Practice, and Evaluate possible essay questions as preparation for a combination multiple choice and essay exam on a psychology text excerpt. The control strategy, POARE, uses limited writing to teach students to Predict, Organize, Answer, Rehearse, and Evaluate performance on short-answer questions as preparation for the same exam. Subjects received extensive training in using each strategy. Results indicate that subjects in the experimental treatment (PORPE) performed significantly better on immediate essay tests and on two-week delayed multiple choice and essay tests than the control students. Essay tests were dichotomously scored for content and holistically scored for content, coherence/organization, and cohesion. Experimental students did not perform significantly differently from the control students on the immediate multiple choice test. The findings suggest that student-directed extended writing engenders greater depth of interaction with psychology material and longer memory of the material than does student-directed limited writing.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24
  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26
  • Thumbnail: Page 
27
    27
  • Thumbnail: Page 
28
    28
  • Thumbnail: Page 
29
    29
  • Thumbnail: Page 
30
    30
  • Thumbnail: Page 
31
    31
  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32
  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33
  • Thumbnail: Page 
34
    34