Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

CACTA Transposons in Triticeae. A Diverse Family of High-Copy Repetitive Elements

Thomas Wicker, Romain Guyot, Nabila Yahiaoui and Beat Keller
Plant Physiology
Vol. 132, No. 1 (May, 2003), pp. 52-63
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4281074
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
CACTA Transposons in Triticeae. A Diverse Family of High-Copy Repetitive Elements
Preview not available

Abstract

In comparison with retrotransposons, which comprise the majority of the Triticeae genomes, very few class 2 transposons have been described in these genomes. Based on the recent discovery of a local accumulation of CACTA elements at the Glu-A3 loci in the two wheat species Triticum monococcum and Triticum durum, we performed a database search for additional such elements in Triticeae spp. A combination of BLAST search and dot-plot analysis of publicly available Triticeae sequences led to the identification of 41 CACTA elements. Only seven of them encode a protein similar to known transposases, whereas the other 34 are considered to be deletion derivatives. A detailed characterization of the identified elements allowed a further classification into seven subgroups. The major subgroup, designated the "Caspar" family, was shown by hybridization to be present in at least 3,000 copies in the T. monococcum genome. The close association of numerous CACTA elements with genes and the identification of several similar elements in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and rice (Oryza sativa) led to the conclusion that CACTA elements contribute significantly to genome size and to organization and evolution of grass genomes.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52
  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53
  • Thumbnail: Page 
54
    54
  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56
  • Thumbnail: Page 
57
    57
  • Thumbnail: Page 
58
    58
  • Thumbnail: Page 
59
    59
  • Thumbnail: Page 
60
    60
  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61
  • Thumbnail: Page 
62
    62
  • Thumbnail: Page 
63
    63