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Generation and Analysis of an Artificial Gene Dosage Series in Tomato to Study the Mechanisms by Which the Cloned Quantitative Trait Locus fw2.2 Controls Fruit Size

Jiping Liu, Bin Cong and Steven D. Tanksley
Plant Physiology
Vol. 132, No. 1 (May, 2003), pp. 292-299
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4281097
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Generation and Analysis of an Artificial Gene Dosage Series in Tomato to Study the Mechanisms by Which the Cloned Quantitative Trait Locus fw2.2 Controls Fruit Size
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Abstract

It has been proposed that fw2.2 encodes a negative fruit-growth regulator that underlies natural fruit-size variation in tomato (Lycopersicon spp.) via heterochronic allelic variation of fw2.2 expression, rather than by variation in the structural protein itself. To further test the negative regulator and the transcriptional control hypotheses, a gene dosage series was constructed, which produced a wider range of fw2.2 transcript accumulation than can be found in natural tomato populations. Fruit developmental analyses revealed that fw2.2 transcript levels were highly correlated (negatively) with fruit mass, supporting the negative regulator and transcriptional regulation hypotheses. Further, the effect of fw2.2 on fruit mass was mediated by repressing three- and two-dimensional cell division in placental and pericarp tissues, respectively. Finally, fw2.2 had little effect on fertility and seed size/number, indicating that fruit size effects of fw2.2 are due largely to expression in the maternal tissues of developing fruit and not mediated through fertility or seed-setting-related processes.

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