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PROTECTING INTERNATIONAL MARINE BIODIVERSITY: INTERNATIONAL TREATIES AND NATIONAL SYSTEMS OF MARINE PROTECTED AREAS

Robin Kundis Craig
Journal of Land Use & Environmental Law
Vol. 20, No. 2 (SPRING 2005), pp. 333-369
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42842976
Page Count: 37
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
PROTECTING INTERNATIONAL MARINE BIODIVERSITY: INTERNATIONAL TREATIES AND NATIONAL SYSTEMS OF MARINE PROTECTED AREAS
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Abstract

Professor Robin Craig's article reviews the intersection of science and international law in the area of marine biodiversity preservation. The author provides an overview of the scientific history of the preservation of marine biodiversity and specifically looks at the change in focus during the last decade from the threats of marine pollution to the threats involved with overfishing. The article addresses the ways international law is beginning to react to this change in scientific emphasis while recognizing that for international legal efforts to address the true extent of the problem they must be tied to evolving scientific knowledge regarding the causes of marine biodiversity loss. Professor Craig concludes that only an international law regime that addresses the threats to marine biodiversity, including pollution and overfishing, both as individual and as collective issues can hope to halt, or even reverse, the increasing trend of marine species extinctions and loss of marine biodiversity at all levels. The author recognizes that more comprehensive marine biodiversity preservation packages are beginning to become a part of international law and recommends that all nations adopt a more comprehensive approach to the preservation of marine biodiversity.

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