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CHANGES IN PUBLIC ATTITUDES TOWARD WOMEN IN POLITICS

Susan WELCH and Lee SIGELMAN
Social Science Quarterly
Vol. 63, No. 2 (June, 1982), pp. 312-322
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42861011
Page Count: 11
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Abstract

Changing U.S. public attitudes toward women in politics are explored using the 1972, 1974, and 1978 NORC General Social Surveys. Modest increases in support for female political activity were found. Nineteen social, economic, and political predictor variables were used to determine sources of support for, and opposition to, women in politics. Core support was found among young people, those with more education, and less frequent church attenders. However, demographic characteristics associated with support for one aspect of an active female political role did not always predispose people to support other aspects of that role. Many attributes expected to be related to attitudes about women's political role were not so related.

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