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MORE ON THE "COST" OF BEING A BLACK OR MEXICAN AMERICAN MALE WORKER

Jeremiah COTTON
Social Science Quarterly
Vol. 66, No. 4 (December 1985), pp. 867-885
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42861990
Page Count: 19
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Abstract

This study departs from past research on this subject in two important ways. First, instead of annual earnings the hourly wage is used as dependent variable. Second, the method used to decompose the differentials on which estimates of these "costs" rest is reformulated. Microdata from the 1973 Current Population Survey and the 1980 Census are used to estimate the relative magnitudes and direction of change in these costs during the 1970s. The findings indicate that costs increased for Mexican Americans and decreased for blacks.

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