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Justice, Democracy, Litigation, and Political Participation

Susan E. LAWRENCE
Social Science Quarterly
Vol. 72, No. 3 (September 1991), pp. 464-477
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42862901
Page Count: 14
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Abstract

Classical democratic theory views political participation as performing an educative function for the citizenry, while modern democratic theory focuses on democratic procedures as an end in themselves. This article argues that litigation may fulfill the educative purpose of democracy as set out in classical democratic theory better than the forms of political participation emphasized in modern democratic theory by engaging litigants in dialogues about justice and the public good as defined by the law.

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