Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

THE 1984 HELMS-HUNT SENATE RACE: A SPATIAL POSTMORTEM OF EMERGING REPUBLICAN STRENGTH IN THE SOUTH

Frederick A. DAY and Gregory A. WEEKS
Social Science Quarterly
Vol. 69, No. 4 (December 1988), pp. 942-960
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42864176
Page Count: 19
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Preview not available
Preview not available

Abstract

This study focuses on the correlates and spatial patterns in North Carolina associated with Helms's 1984 Senate victory. Two stepwise regression and residual analyses of the 100 counties reveal that the Helms vote was most significantly associated with predominantly white counties and, secondarily, blue-collar, middleincome counties. Hunt's support came from areas with high percentages of either nonwhites or the college-educated. In addition, both garnered support in areas of traditional party strength. This analysis suggests a continuing shift in voter support toward the Republican party, and toward more racially and philosophically polarized parties.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[942]
    [942]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
943
    943
  • Thumbnail: Page 
944
    944
  • Thumbnail: Page 
945
    945
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[946]
    [946]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
947
    947
  • Thumbnail: Page 
948
    948
  • Thumbnail: Page 
949
    949
  • Thumbnail: Page 
950
    950
  • Thumbnail: Page 
951
    951
  • Thumbnail: Page 
952
    952
  • Thumbnail: Page 
953
    953
  • Thumbnail: Page 
954
    954
  • Thumbnail: Page 
955
    955
  • Thumbnail: Page 
956
    956
  • Thumbnail: Page 
957
    957
  • Thumbnail: Page 
958
    958
  • Thumbnail: Page 
959
    959
  • Thumbnail: Page 
960
    960