Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Evolution of respiration rate, internal CO₂ or O₂ and resistance to gas diffusion of anaerobic exposed and waxed 'Miho' satsuma fruits during market life

A. Piga, S. D'Aquino and M. Agabbio
Advances in Horticultural Science
Vol. 12, No. 3 (1998), pp. 132-137
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42883199
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Evolution of respiration rate, internal CO₂ or O₂ and resistance to gas diffusion of anaerobic exposed and waxed 'Miho' satsuma fruits during market life
Preview not available

Abstract

'Miho' satsumas received an anaerobic treatment with N₂ or CO₂ for 24 hr at 20°C before being waxed with shellac and transferred to 20°C for 30 days, in order to measure respiration rate, internal gas evolution (CO₂ and O₂) and peel resistance to CO₂ diffusion. Ethanol in the juice, as well as taste and appearance were also determined. Respiration rate decreased by more than half following 30 days of storage, while internal CO₂ and O₂ rose and decreased, respectively. Conversely, resistance to CO₂ diffusion increased drastically with time in storage. Waxing significantly decreased respiration rate and doubled resistance to CO₂ diffusion, while anaerobic treatments did not influence physiological parameters. Off-flavour development due to time in storage or wax application strongly affected taste of fruits. Exposition to CO₂ negatively influenced fruit taste also, with respect to control and N₂ exposed fruits. In general, the higher the ethanol content in the juice, the higher the off-flavour score and the lower the acceptability by panellists. The external fruit appearance declined with time in storage. Waxing or anaerobic treated fruits maintained a better freshness than control fruits. From a commercial standpoint the best result was gained with non-waxed nitrogen-treated fruits, which stored satisfactorily for 10 days.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
132
    132
  • Thumbnail: Page 
133
    133
  • Thumbnail: Page 
134
    134
  • Thumbnail: Page 
135
    135
  • Thumbnail: Page 
136
    136
  • Thumbnail: Page 
137
    137