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TRAINING ELEMENTARY STUDENTS TO PROMPT TEACHER PRAISE

E. Rosemarie Hrydowy, E. Rosemary Hrydowy, Trevor F. Stokes and Garry L. Martin
Education and Treatment of Children
Vol. 7, No. 2 (Spring, 1984), pp. 99-108
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42898838
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
TRAINING ELEMENTARY STUDENTS TO PROMPT TEACHER PRAISE
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Abstract

The effects of a training program teaching six fourth grade students to cue or prompt positive feedback from their classroom teacher, was studied using a multiple-baseline-across-groups design. Since appropriate positive environments that maintain specific academic behavior may not always exist, skills allowing-students to prompt teacher praise and modify environmental contingencies would be beneficial to those experiencing low rates of positive teacher feedback. The training procedure required students to complete portions of an academic exercise, evaluate the quality of completed work, and prompt or cue the trainer for positive feedback. Spontaneous generalization of cueing skills to the classroom indicated an increase in the percentage of sessions where cueing occurred over that of baseline for five of six students. In addition, an increase in the rate of teacher praise was recorded for four of six students. Further increases in student cueing occurred for four of six students during instructed generalization. Although a decrease in the rate of praise over the previous condition was recorded, the rate exceeded that of baseline for three students, remained the same for one, and decreased for two students.

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