Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Sexual dimorphism and trophic constraints: Prey selection in the European polecat (Mustela putorius)

Thierry LODÉ
Écoscience
Vol. 10, No. 1 (2003), pp. 17-23
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42901503
Page Count: 7
  • Download ($54.00)
  • Cite this Item
Sexual dimorphism and trophic constraints: Prey selection in the European polecat (Mustela putorius)
Preview not available

Abstract

Although widespread among mammals, sexual dimorphism raises several evolutionary and ecological issues. Despite strong sexual dimorphism (reaching the ratio 1.81), a study of diet and prey selection in polecats (Mustela putorius) revealed only minor differences in their feeding habits. There was a greater frequency of large-sized prey (mainly lagomorphs) in the summer diet of females than in that of males. The frequency of anurans (Rana dalmatina and Bufo bufo) in the diet did not differ significantly between the two sexes. Male prey predominated in the diet of both sexes. Although prey availability, as indicated by the trapping of small rodents and anurans, showed a predominance of males in populations, Ivlev's index for selectivity demonstrated selective prédation on male prey exceeding availability both by male and female polecats. This selective prédation by polecats may affect both population structure and population exchanges. My results suggest that sexual dimorphism of polecats was not linked to a different prey choice but results from independent intrasexual selective pressures, thus refuting the predictions of the trophic niche differentiation hypothesis. The wide size dimorphism reflects selection both for mating access in males and for food in females, illustrating the complementary influence of sexual selection and environmental constraints on sex divergence in growth. Bien qu'il soit très répandu chez les mammifères, le dimorphisme sexuel soulève plusieurs problèmes de nature évolutive et écologique. En dépit d'un grand dimorphisme sexuel atteignant un rapport de 1,81, une étude de l'alimentation et de la sélection des proies chez le putois (Mustela putorius) n'a permis de montrer qu'une différence partielle des habitudes alimentaires entre les sexes. Les femelles de putois consomment plus de grosses proies (principalement des Lagomorphes) que les mâles. La fréquence des Anoures (Rana dalmatina et Bufo bufo) dans le régime ne diffère pas considérablement en fonction du sexe. Les proies mâles prédominent dans le régime des deux sexes. Bien que la disponibilité des proies montre une prédominance de mâles dans les populations, l'indice de sélectivité d'Ivlev indique une prédation sélective s'exerçant sur les proies mâles et excédant cette disponibilité autant chez les putois mâles que femelles. Cette prédation sélective du putois peut affecter autant la structure des populations que les échanges de population. Ces résultats suggèrent que le dimorphisme sexuel des putois n'est pas lié à un choix de proies différentiel mais résulte de pressions sélectives intrasexuelles indépendantes, réfutant ainsi les prédictions de l'hypothèse de la differentiation de niche trophique. L'importance du dimorphisme sexuel reflète à la fois la sélection pour l'accès à la copulation chez les mâles et l'accès aux ressources alimentaires chez les femelles, illustrant l'influence complémentaire de la sélection sexuelle et des contraintes de l'environnement sur la divergence de croissance des sexes.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[17]
    [17]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23