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The Development of the Fruit Walls in Carya

K. KANIEWSKI
Annals of Botany
New Series, Vol. 29, No. 116 (OCTOBER 1965), pp. 589-608
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42907857
Page Count: 20
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The Development of the Fruit Walls in Carya
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Abstract

Both the pistillate flowers and the developing fruits of Carya ovata and C. cordiformis are covered with secretory and protective hairs. There are two kinds of the secretory hairs. In the more frequent one the volatile oils are accumulated under the cuticle covering the cells of the head. In the other the secretory substances are accumulated inside the cells. The flowers and the developing fruits of the two investigated species have quite large emergences on which the stornata most often occur. During the development of the fruit lenticels are formed in the green hull. Tannins are accumulated not only in the green hull, but also in the carpellary layer and in the packing tissue. There are some differences between C. ovata and C cordiformis in the course of sclerification of the green hull. In C. cordiformis the hull is less sclerified than in C. ovata, and the sclerification of the carpellary layer occurs later. At a certain period rather large gaps are present in the lignifying shell (in the regions of the sutures) where the cells have thin cellulose walls. These gaps are partly filled with sclereids. The gaps become reduced to narrow chinks, in which the cell walls remain unlignified. The hard shell is not formed in all its width at the same time. During the process of formation of the hard fruit shell there may arise single sclereids surrounded by thin-walled cells. Within a short time these undergo a similar modification and the tissue becomes uniform as sclerenchyma. The sclereids of the hard shell have, in general, strongly folded cell walls. Owing to this they overlap each other.

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