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The Effect of Temperature during Growth on the Subsequent Rate of Photosynthesis in Leaves of Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.)

JANE WOLEDGE and O. R. JEWISS
Annals of Botany
New Series, Vol. 33, No. 133 (NOVEMBER 1969), pp. 897-913
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42908757
Page Count: 17
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The Effect of Temperature during Growth on the Subsequent Rate of Photosynthesis in Leaves of Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.)
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Abstract

Two experiments are reported in which young plants of tall fescue were grown in temperature regimes of 20 °C day/15 °C night or 10 °C day/5 °C night until the fourth leaf on the main stem was fully expanded. These temperature regimes were then either changed over for individual plants or continued unchanged up to the seven-leaf stage. Photosynthesis and respiration rates were determined in the fourth and subsequent leaves and also in ageing leaves, using an infra-red gas analyser in an open system and at temperatures of 10 and 20 °C in one and 10, 15, 20, and 25 °C in the other experiment. Rates of apparent photosynthesis per unit leaf area in fully expanded leaves differed little as a result of previous treatment and were not greatly affected by temperature during measurement. However, the specific leaf area and the rate of apparent photosynthesis per unit dry weight were higher in plants grown at the high temperature. Leaves from the high-temperature regime had a higher optimum temperature for apparent photosynthesis, a shorter life, and a lower respiration rate at any one temperature of measurement than did leaves from the low-temperature regime. After transfer from one temperature regime to the other, the rate of apparent photosynthesis of the next leaf to become fully expanded was higher in plants transferred from low to high temperature and lower in plants transferred from high to low than in plants remaining in either temperature regime; the leaves which subsequently expanded had rates similar to those of unchanged plants. In leaves which were fully expanded at the time of transfer, the rate of apparent photosynthesis rose after transfer to the high-temperature regime and fell after transfer to the low-temperature regime. These results are discussed in relation to growth-analysis data from other plants grown in the same conditions.

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