Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF NUTRIENT LOADS IN OVERLAND FLOW AND SUBSURFACE DRAINAGE FROM A MARGINAL LAND SITE IN SOUTH-EAST IRELAND

T.G. Ibrahim, O. Fenton, K.G. Richards, R.M. Fealy and M.G. Healy
Biology and Environment: Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy
Vol. 113B, No. 2 (2013), pp. 169-186
Published by: Royal Irish Academy
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42912449
Page Count: 18
  • Download ($10.00)
  • Cite this Item
SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF NUTRIENT LOADS IN OVERLAND FLOW AND SUBSURFACE DRAINAGE FROM A MARGINAL LAND SITE IN SOUTH-EAST IRELAND
Preview not available

Abstract

In Ireland, Food Harvest 2020 focuses on increasing productivity while enhancing environmental sustainability of agricultural land. On underutilised or marginal land, drainage systems may be installed to expand agricultural enterprises. Mixed nutrient losses are inevitable from any drainage system, but assessing processes leading to differences in nutrient speciation, fractionation and losses in grasslands between locations or flow paths is important to achieve sustainability. This study investigates these processes in overland flow and subsurface drains over three rainfall events from four non-grazed plots recently converted from marginal land in the south-east of Ireland. A shallower water table and smaller plot size resulted in greater water and nutrient losses in overland flow per unit of land area. Nutrient losses were less in subsurface drains. Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) dominated, but dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) was more abundant in the drains. Particulate phosphorus generally dominated in drains, except in plots with a shallow water table where dissolved unreactive phosphorus (DUP) was more abundant. In overland flow, a shallower water table resulted in a switch from dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) to DUP. Fertilisation increased phosphorus losses in overland flow, with DRP dominating. These results highlight the importance of an integrated assessment of the controls on flow and nutrient losses to design drainage systems in marginal lands.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
169
    169
  • Thumbnail: Page 
170
    170
  • Thumbnail: Page 
171
    171
  • Thumbnail: Page 
172
    172
  • Thumbnail: Page 
173
    173
  • Thumbnail: Page 
174
    174
  • Thumbnail: Page 
175
    175
  • Thumbnail: Page 
176
    176
  • Thumbnail: Page 
177
    177
  • Thumbnail: Page 
178
    178
  • Thumbnail: Page 
179
    179
  • Thumbnail: Page 
180
    180
  • Thumbnail: Page 
181
    181
  • Thumbnail: Page 
182
    182
  • Thumbnail: Page 
183
    183
  • Thumbnail: Page 
184
    184
  • Thumbnail: Page 
185
    185
  • Thumbnail: Page 
186
    186