Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Photoinhibition during Acclimatization of Micropropagated Spathiphyllum "Petite" Plantlets

J. M. Van Huylenbroeck, H. Huygens and P. C. Debergh
In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology. Plant
Vol. 31, No. 3 (Jul. - Sep., 1995), pp. 160-164
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4293081
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Photoinhibition during Acclimatization of Micropropagated Spathiphyllum "Petite" Plantlets
Preview not available

Abstract

Micropropagated Spathiphyllum "Petite" plantlets were acclimatized at low- or high-light intensities [photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) $100 or 300 \mu{mol} \cdot m^{-2} \cdot s^{-1}$]. During the first days chlorophyll fluorescence measurements show a partial photoinhibition of the photosynthetic apparatus, expressed by a decrease of the variable over maximal fluorescence ratio (Fv/Fm). This inhibition of Fv/Fm was significantly higher for plants grown at high-light intensity, leading to a photooxidation of chlorophyll. Newly formed leaves were better adapted to the ex vitro climatic condition (as shown by the increase of the Fv/Fm ratio) and had a higher net photosynthesis compared with in vitro formed leaves. Nevertheless, plants grown at $300 \mu mol \cdot m^{-2} \cdot s^{-1}$ were photoinhibited, compared with those at $100 \mu{mol} \cdot m^{-2} \cdot m^{-2} \cdot s^{-1}$. A sudden exposure to high-light intensity of 1-, 10- or 25-d-old transplanted plants (shift in PPFD from $100 to 300 \mu mol \cdot m^{-2} \cdot s^{-1}$) gave a linear decrease of Fv/Fm over a 12-h period, which was reflected in a 50% reduction of net photosynthesis. No significant interaction between day and hour was found, indicating high-light exposure causes the same photoinhibitory effect on in vitro and ex vitro formed leaves.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
160
    160
  • Thumbnail: Page 
161
    161
  • Thumbnail: Page 
162
    162
  • Thumbnail: Page 
163
    163
  • Thumbnail: Page 
164
    164