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INTERRELATIONSHIPS AMONG IRON, MANGANESE, AND MOLYBDENUM IN THE GROWTH AND NUTRITION OF TOMATOES GROWN IN CULTURE SOLUTION

R. K. KIRSCH, M. E. HARWARD and R. G. PETERSEN
Plant and Soil
Vol. 12, No. 3 (April 1960), pp. 259-275
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42931844
Page Count: 17
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INTERRELATIONSHIPS AMONG IRON, MANGANESE, AND MOLYBDENUM IN THE GROWTH AND NUTRITION OF TOMATOES GROWN IN CULTURE SOLUTION
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Abstract

In a study designed to determine the effects of different levels of iron, manganese, and molybdenum on the growth and nutrition of tomato plants, a solution-culture e×periment was carried out in the greenhouse under relatively controlled conditions. Results indicated that : 1. Iron × molybdenum and iron × manganese interactions on yield were found to be much higher than that for manganese × molybdenum. It was suggested that the manganese relationship to molybdenum was exhibited indirectly through these other interactions. Yield data strongly suggested the existence of a three-way iron × manganese × molybdenum interaction. 2. Added iron counteracted the yield-depressing effect of added manganese, but the amount of iron required to attain maximum yield increased as the molybdenum supply was increased. 3. At lower iron levels, added molybdenum decreased yields; at higher iron levels, added molybdenum increased yields. 4. Iron additions appeared to stimulate the translocation of molybdenum from roots to leaves but reduced total molybdenum uptake. Added molybdenum tended to accumulate in roots in toxic quantities at lower iron levels but not at higher iron levels. 5. At both lower iron and lower manganese levels, added molybdenum had little effect on manganese uptake; at lower iron and higher manganese levels, molybdenum decreased the manganese uptake; at higher iron and higher manganese levels, molybdenum increased manganese uptake. It was concluded that an iron-manganese-molybdenum relationship existed which governed growth response to any of these three elements and that the relationship of manganese to molybdenum was manifested indirectly through iron and the iron X manganese and iron X molybdenum interactions. The results of this investigation illustrate the necessity of an adequate number of levels of treatment variables across sufficiently wide concentration ranges, if interrelationships are to be satisfactorily described.

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