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Cytokinins, Auxins and Activated Charcoal Affect Organogenesis and Anatomical Characteristics of Shoot-Tip Cultures of Lisianthus [Eustoma grandiflorum (Raf.) Shinn]

Kee-Yoeup Paek and Eun-Joo Hahn
In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology. Plant
Vol. 36, No. 2 (Mar. - Apr., 2000), pp. 128-132
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4293324
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Cytokinins, Auxins and Activated Charcoal Affect Organogenesis and Anatomical Characteristics of Shoot-Tip Cultures of Lisianthus [Eustoma grandiflorum (Raf.) Shinn]
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Abstract

Variants from seed-propagated Lisianthus [Eustoma grandiflorum (Raf.) Shinn] were shoot-tip cultured to observe the effects of cytokinins, auxins and activated charcoal on organogenesis and anatomical characteristics. $N^{6}-Benzyladenine$ (BA) and kinetin at high concentrations ($13.32-22.2 and 13.94-23.23 \mu M$) resulted in good shoot formation but high percentages of hyperhydric shoots. Increased indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) concentrations favored root formation, while increased naphthaleneacetic acid concentration adversely affected root formation. Both shoot and root development were suppressed by activated charcoal. The highest percentage of regeneration and the largest number of glaucous shoots with an average of 15 shoots per explant after 4 wk of culture were obtained when the shoot tips were cultured on MS (Murashige and Skoog, 1962) medium supplemented with $4.44 \mu M$ BA and $1.47-4.92 \mu M$ IAA and IBA. In vitro-grown leaves had a higher number of stomata than field-grown leaves but the length and diameter of stomata showed no significant difference between the two types. Field-grown leaves had well-developed epicuticular wax layers, which were not observed on hyperhydric leaves. Hyperhydric plantlets could not survive when transplanted to soil, whereas glaucous plantlets survived in more than 80% of cases. Variation in soil type resulted in a slight difference in plantlet survival. Based on the results of our experiment, this protocol should be useful for the rapid micropropagation of lisianthus.

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