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Micropropagation of Eucalyptus nitens Maiden (Shining Gum)

Filomena Gomes and Jorge M. Canhoto
In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology. Plant
Vol. 39, No. 3 (May - Jun., 2003), pp. 316-321
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4293616
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Micropropagation of Eucalyptus nitens Maiden (Shining Gum)
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Abstract

Eucalyptus nitens Maiden (shining gum) is a frost-tolerant species of Eucalyptus that can be used as an alternative species to Eucalyptus globulus in some regions of Portugal where winter temperatures are too low. Seedlings and 1-yr-old shoot tips and nodes were used for micropropagation of E. nitens. The best multiplication rate (2.25) was obtained when seedling shoots (< 15 mm) were cultured on a medium containing the major nutrients (at half-strength) and minor elements of Murashige and Skoog (1962) medium, the organics of De Fossard medium (De Fossard et al., 1974) and a combination of benzyladenine (0.9 µM) and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (0.05 µM). Seedling cuttings (4-, 8-, and 10-wk-old) rooted well on media containing several concentrations of 3-indolebutyric acid (4.9, 9.8, and 14.8 µM) or 3-indoleacetic acid (5.7, 11.4, and 17.1 µM), giving frequencies of root induction above 80%. With this type of explant, root formation was also found on basal medium without growth regulators. Rooting of in vitro-propagated shoots obtained from seedlings (8-wk-old) after four subcultures (every 3 wk) was more difficult, with the best results obtained on a medium containing 14.7 µM 3-indolebutyric acid (60.0% root induction). No root formation was achieved when shoots from 1-yr-old explants were used. After a period of 4 mo., 96.3% of the plants transferred to the greenhouse survived acclimatization.

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