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A Comparison of Risk and Resilience Indicators Among Latino/a Students: Differences Between Students Identified as At-Risk, Learning Disabled, Speech Impaired and Not At-Risk

Laurel M. Robertson, Meri S. Harding and Gale M. Morrison
Education and Treatment of Children
Vol. 21, No. 3 (AUGUST 1998), pp. 333-353
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42940511
Page Count: 21
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Comparison of Risk and Resilience Indicators Among Latino/a Students: Differences Between Students Identified as At-Risk, Learning Disabled, Speech Impaired and Not At-Risk
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Abstract

Students who were at-risk for school failure, experiencing learning or speech disabilities and students considered non-risk were compared using measures of student selfperceptions and teacher behavioral and academic perceptions. Risk and resiliency concepts such as academic and social self-concept problem behaviors, social support, cooperation, school bonding and social problem solving were the focus of comparison. Gender differences were also examined. At-risk students showed a profile of low grades, fewer study and social skills and more problem behaviors, compared to their peers. The students in this group did not rate themselves differently from peers on these constructs. Students with learning disabilities were rated by teachers as having behavioral and academic difficulties but rated themselves as having elevated social self-concept, despite low levels of social support. Students eligible for speech and language services showed a profile of school alienation with low school bonding and poor peer self-concept. Implications for utilizing resiliency constructs for the early identification of behavior problems in students as well as the need for school-linked mental health programming to address emotional and behavioral needs of youths are discussed.

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