Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Practice of Music as an Expression of Religious Philosophy among the East-Ashkenazi Jews

Judit Frigyesi
Shofar
Vol. 18, No. 4, Special Issue: Jewish Music (SUMMER 2000), pp. 3-24
Published by: Purdue University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42943104
Page Count: 22
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Practice of Music as an Expression of Religious Philosophy among the East-Ashkenazi Jews
Preview not available

Abstract

The article attempts to provide a conceptual framework for the discussion of the liturgical music of the East-Ashkenazi Jews. It discusses why our commonly accepted categories such as "prayer," "speech," "sacred," "music," "art" cannot be applied, as separate categories, to East-Ashkenazi culture. The article discusses this issue by "fusion groups," conceptual categories that fuse categories that are commonly thought of as being distinct and separate. This fusion means that aspects listed as belonging to one fusion group appear in the practice of the religious Jews as an indivisible whole. For instance, in the traditional context, melody is not an additional element but part and parcel of the text, inseparable from it and inconceivable without it, and vice versa: text is inconceivable without its melody. Similarly, meaning is not separable from a transcendental state, and neither meaning nor religious state is separable from the actual performance of the text with melody. Thus melody does not "express" meaning—it becomes one with it. These ideas are explained and illustrated by documents coming from the sacred written sources as well as from the practices observed and the opinions received from informants during twenty years of fieldwork projects.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24