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Bio-Stretch, a Computerized Cell Strain Apparatus for Three-Dimensional Organotypic Cultures

Mingyao Liu, Shahram Montazeri, Tony Jedlovsky, Ryan Van Wert, Jun Zhang, Ren-Ke Li and Jun Yan
In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology. Animal
Vol. 35, No. 2 (Feb., 1999), pp. 87-93
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4294897
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Bio-Stretch, a Computerized Cell Strain Apparatus for Three-Dimensional Organotypic Cultures
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Abstract

In the present study, a unique mechanical strain apparatus for three-dimensional organotypic cultures was developed into a computerized system. It consists of a personal computer running Windows-based software, the Bio-Stretch Manager, a Bio-Stretch Controller, and three sets of magnet boards. Cells are cultured on a Gelfoam® sponge that is placed in a 35-mm petri dish with one end glued to the dish, and the other end attached to a coated steel bar. The petri dish is placed in front of a magnet, and the movement of the steel bar is controlled by dynamically changing the magnetic field. Up to five stretch patterns of variable frequency, duty cycle, and magnitude can be designed for each stretch regimen. Three different stretch regimens can be tested simultaneously. The operational characteristics of sponges were examined. Attachment of cells to the sponges was observed on several cell types. These features provide wide options for using this system to study the effects of mechanical stretch on cells.

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