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A Novel Cell Array Technique for High-Throughput, Cell-Based Analysis

A. Waterworth, A. Hanby and V. Speirs
In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology. Animal
Vol. 41, No. 7 (Jul. - Aug., 2005), pp. 185-187
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4295618
Page Count: 3
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Novel Cell Array Technique for High-Throughput, Cell-Based Analysis
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Abstract

Microarray technology has burgeoned over the past few years from nucleic acid-based arrays to tissue microarrays (TMAs). This study aimed to develop a technique to incorporate cell lines into an array and to demonstrate the usefulness of this technique by performing immunohistochemistry for β-catenin. Cell suspensions were prepared from 23 tumor cell lines. These were fixed in formalin, suspended in agar, and embedded in paraffin to produce a cell block. A "tissue microarrayer" was used to remove triplicate, 0.6 mm-cores from each cell block and to transfer these into a recipient paraffin block at precise coordinates. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify cell lines positive for β-catenin. Cultured cells were successfully incorporated into the microarray, with preservation of cell architecture and even distribution of cells within each core. A total of 18 of 69 cores (26%) were lost in processing. A total of 16 of 23 cell lines were identified as positive for membrane and cytoplasmic β-catenin, and 6 of 23 were negative. Only one cell line was unscorable because of complete core loss. We have developed a "cell microarray" technique for analyzing antigen expression by immunohistochemistry in multiple cell lines in a single experiment. This novel application of microarrays permits high-throughput, cost-efficient analysis, with the potential to rapidly identify markers with potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications in human disease.

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