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Correlation of Hyaluronic Acid Accumulation and the Growth of Preneoplastic Mammary Cells in Collagen: A Longitudinal Study

Jean Hitzeman, Philip G. Woost and Howard L. Hosick
In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology
Vol. 28A, No. 4 (Apr., 1992), pp. 284-292
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4296849
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Correlation of Hyaluronic Acid Accumulation and the Growth of Preneoplastic Mammary Cells in Collagen: A Longitudinal Study
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Abstract

Hyaluronic acid accumulation is characteristic of mammary tumor cells, and the amount that accumulates seems to correlate with the degree of malignancy of the producing cells. We have tested directly the relationship between hyaluronic acid accumulation and the replication rate of preneoplastic mammary cells in culture. We used nontumorigenic but immortal CL-S1 mouse mammary cells that were derived from a hyperplastic alveolar nodule. Using a collagen gel culture system, we found clear differences in the growth properties of cells before and after Passages 68 to 70. Late passage cells replicated earlier and faster than early passage cells in collagen and on plastic. The rate of cycling resembled that of tumorigenic mouse mammary cells during the first week of culture. Cells seeded at low densities cycled faster than those seeded at high densities during the second week in culture. Exogenous hyaluronic acid, at 10 to 1000 µg/ml, neither enhanced nor inhibited CL-S1 cell growth significantly in collagen, regardless of passage. However, by the third day in collagen, late passage cells produced 7 times more total glycosaminoglycans and 12 times more hyaluronic acid per cell than did early passage cells. Late passage cells also deposited 12 times more labeled hyaluronic acid in the matrix than did early passage cells, on a per-cell basis. After a decline in the deposition of hyaluronic acid in the extracellular matrix, growth ceased. The late passage cells did not grow in soft agar, indicating that they had not become neoplastic spontaneously during passage. However, their accelerated growth rate, coupled with the synthesis and secretion of large amounts of hyaluronic acid into the extracellular matrix, may characterize a distinct step in tumor progression in preneoplastic CL-S1 ceUs.

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