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IRELAND AND THE IRISH IN PINTER

Harry White
AAA: Arbeiten aus Anglistik und Amerikanistik
Vol. 14, No. 2 (1989), pp. 161-165
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43023500
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
IRELAND AND THE IRISH IN PINTER
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Abstract

Two distinct modes of reference to Ireland and the Irish are discernible in Harold Pinter's work from 1958 until 1978. In such plays as The Birthday Party, Old Times and Betrayal, as well as in the screenplay adaptation of Aidan Higgins' novel Langrishe, Go Down, the idea of Ireland is used by Pinter to encode the threat of violence or to symbolize the past. In The Birthday Party and No Man's Land, it is the violent side of this dualism which is to the fore, although the characterisation of McCann in the earlier play also admits of "Ireland" as an i mage of the happy past. In Old Times and Betrayal the use of this image is intensified, and in the Langrishe screenplay Pinter develops the notion of "Irish" and "non-Irish" to the point where it accommodates the "victor-victim" pattern so familiar in many of his plays.

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