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DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR LARGE LOG BUILDINGS IN COLD CLIMATES

TANG G. LEE
Journal of Architectural and Planning Research
Vol. 1, No. 2 (August 1984), pp. 105-120
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43028681
Page Count: 16
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR LARGE LOG BUILDINGS IN COLD CLIMATES
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Abstract

Thermal performance of log walls is less important in larger buildings than in single-family log houses. Large buildings have less exterior wall area in relationship to the volume contained than the smaller sized buildings. Furthermore, internal heat generation from lighting, mechanical systems, and occupants is also greater in larger buildings during periods of occupancy. As a result, large log structures can be thermally adequate in the cold northern climates of Canada, despite the relatively high thermal conductivity of log walls. This paper presents the results of a study by an interdisciplinary team consisting of a building scientist, a cost consultant, engineers, a forest consultant, and experienced log designers and builders. The team was assembled by the Department of Public Works, Government of the Northwest Territories (NWT) for the purpose of determining the feasibility of using logs as a primary building material for the Canadian far north. The main purpose of this paper, however, is to identify the environmental parameters affecting the performance of log walls. This study is based on a review of available technical literature, particularly on the thermal performance of log structures, climatic conditions, and site investigation of similar type and size buildings in the NWT. The results indicate that the thermal property of log walls improves traditional design values considerably when subjected to the climatic conditions of the Canadian far north.

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