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PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING IN WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Geoffrey J. Syme, Duncan K. Macpherson and Phillip Fry
Journal of Architectural and Planning Research
Vol. 4, No. 4, Special Issue: Design and Democracy (December, 1987), pp. 310-321
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43028858
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING IN WESTERN AUSTRALIA
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Abstract

This paper describes the influence of the social and political context on public involvement in environmental planning in the South West of Western Australia (W.A.). It deals with three case studies: regional conservation through reserves, the response to an industrial air pollution problem in a small community, and a large scale domestic water use study. Observations are made on the differences between the U.S.A. and W.A. in information distribution, selection of participants and provision of support to participants. The role of the authors as researchers and participants is analyzed in terms of the pressures of academic, public and official expectations. The effects of the political and administrative structures, the geographical scope of the issues and the prevailing planning paradigms on the limits to public involvement are considered. The success of the public involvement program in each case study is evaluated according to criteria current in the literature, and the criteria are examined critically. It is concluded that the effects of the context on what is possible in public involvement are too important to allow the development of context-free criteria for participation.

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