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Journal Article

A POST-OCCUPANCY EVALUATION OF WAYFINDING IN A PEDIATRIC HOSPITAL: RESEARCH FINDINGS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR INSTRUCTION

Barbara Brown, Holly Wright and Craig Brown
Journal of Architectural and Planning Research
Vol. 14, No. 1 (Spring, 1997), pp. 35-51
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43029243
Page Count: 17
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A POST-OCCUPANCY EVALUATION OF WAYFINDING IN A PEDIATRIC HOSPITAL: RESEARCH FINDINGS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR INSTRUCTION
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Abstract

A post-occupancy evaluation (POE) of way finding in a new pediatrie hospital pointed to a wide range of areas where wayfinding aids could be improved. After initial walk-through evaluation tours and meetings with administrators, five more systematic methods were used to assess problems: staff and visitor interviews, staff-maintained logs to record visitor requests for wayfinding, photographed traces in problem areas, behavior observation and tracking of visitors, and cognitive maps drawn by patients and parents. From the larger report of findings and recommendations, a few results are highlighted: a general assessment of wayfinding processes and problems, the importance of distinguishing inpatient and outpatient areas, the problems of radial floor layouts, and general problems with signs, colors, and other wayfinding cues. Results underscore the importance of triangulation — relying on multiple research methods to assess wayfinding. Issues relating to conducting post-occupancy analyses as class projects are also addressed.

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