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MUSICA CLASSICA vs MUSICA MODERNA NEL "DE CARDINALATU" DI PAOLO CORTESI

Fiorella Brancacci
Il Saggiatore musicale
Vol. 6, No. 1/2 (1999), pp. 5-22
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43029551
Page Count: 18
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
MUSICA CLASSICA vs MUSICA MODERNA NEL "DE CARDINALATU" DI PAOLO CORTESI
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Abstract

The paragraph entitled Canendi ratio in Paolo Cortesi's De cardinalatu presents two problems which up to now have remained unsolved. The first problem is how to interpret the paragraph in relation to its function in the section entitled De musica; the second problem is a linguistic one, and concerns the meaning of the term aberruncatorium. On the basis of philological analysis, the author reconstructs the meaning of the term (litany) and brings to light the historical event (which, according to Cortesi, institutionalised Gregorian chant) to which the term alludes. Concern with the issue of musical liturgy is not unique to the paragraph Canendi ratio; it can also be seen in a long (and previously unpublished) section of the chapter De missa, of which the author provides a translation and commentary. The essay finally shows that the tripartition between dorian, lydian, and phrygian practice, linked by Cortesi to the analysis of liturgical music, is used in the paragraph Canendi ratio to parse a varied and complex musical repertory which is rooted in a more or less distant past, and which constitutes — vis-à-vis the genres of modern and contemporary music examined in the following paragraph — the "classical" patrimony of vocal music.

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