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INTRODUCTION: TIME AND LANDSCAPE

James M. Mayo
Journal of Architectural and Planning Research
Vol. 26, No. 2, Theme Issue: Time and Landscape (Summer, 2009), pp. 91-94
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43030857
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
INTRODUCTION: TIME AND LANDSCAPE
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Abstract

When experiencing landscapes, we commonly assess our experiences in terms of what we see without considering time. In the design professions, we are enticed into this deception by the tools we use. Cameras, drawings, and plans direct us to rationalize landscapes as fixed features. Critics have often chided architects for taking photos of buildings in which there are no people. We see images of architectural settings as sculpted forms, as if we are visiting them in a museum. But the messiness of social life and culture includes time, and landscapes exist in time, not apart from it.

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