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Konfession und Nation im Raum des ehemaligen Jugoslawien: Ein Überblick vom 19. Jahrhundert bis in die Gegenwart

Ludwig Steindorff
Kirchliche Zeitgeschichte
Vol. 10, No. 1, Bürgerkieg und Religion (1997), pp. 122-137
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43096714
Page Count: 16
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Konfession und Nation im Raum des ehemaligen Jugoslawien: Ein Überblick vom 19. Jahrhundert bis in die Gegenwart
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Abstract

In the 19th and 20th centuries most of Europe emerged from the control of vast empires with their dominant religious patterns and instead established separate nations, seeking their own identities. In the 19th century this path was followed by the Slovenian, Croatian and Serbian nations. In the interwar period the attempt to build a centralized state and an artificial Yugoslavian identity proved to be a failure. After 1945 a federated socialist republic was constructed, in which each of the above nations was accorded the status of its own republic. The Muslims, increasingly secularized, came to regard Bosnia-Herzogovina as their republic. Despite the attempts of the communist regime to marginalize all religious denominations, the Catholics succeeded best in resisting such tendencies. But the economic and social crises after 1980 opened the way for more intense nationalist conflicts and eventually led to the civil war of 1991-1995. Yet despite the strong attachments of the religious communities to each warring faction, this was not really a War of Religion, but rather a nationalist struggle. Each of the successor states, apart from Bosnia-Herzogovina, is in fact a separate national entity.

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