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« El coraçon del Estado ». Documenti sulla fabbrica del Castello Sforzesco nella seconda età spagnola (1599-1706)

Marino Viganò
Arte Lombarda
Nuova serie, No. 136 (3) (2002), pp. 21-37
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43106349
Page Count: 17
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Abstract

The Castello Sforzesco in Milan is the civic building that foreign powers that ruled Milan took care of best between the first half of the XVI century and the second half of the XVIII century. From Charles V (1535-1556) to Francis II (1792-1796/1799-1800) numerous projects and constructions transformed the Renaissance construction — the Sforzesque quadrangle surrounded by the rectangle of the Ghirlanda — into a powerful Baroque military citadel with a twelve point star-shaped plan. The chronology of the grandi fabbriche — the tenailles (1551-1552), the three bastions facing out towards the city (1560-1569) — and the succession of engineers of the first period are already well known. Less so is the development of the polygon in the period when it was completed, with the three bastions facing out towards the park (1591-1602) and the accessory work, counterscarp, covered road and glacis (1607-1613). The same can be said for the phase of expansion with six ravelins, from the plan (1646-1647) to their construction (1656). In the years that followed, there were many unfinished projects for more fortifications (1658, 1666, 1687 and 1701). Until a complete history of the construction of the Castello in this late period has been written, the article presents unpublished or little known archival and iconographical documents on the monument that has been at the heart of urbanistic and military events in Milan from the Middle Ages to the end of the period of Spanish rule.

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