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Chlorinated Paraffins: An Environmental Hazard?

Olof Svanberg and Eva Lindén
Ambio
Vol. 8, No. 5 (1979), pp. 206-209
Published by: Springer on behalf of Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4312474
Page Count: 4
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Chlorinated Paraffins: An Environmental Hazard?
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Abstract

Chlorinated paraffins form a large group of products, used mainly as secondary plasticizers, oil additives and flame retardants. World production amounts to about 230 000 metric tons per year. Lack of specific sensitive analytical methods has made it impossible to explore the spread of these persistent chemicals in the environment. The extent of their degradation and the degradation products formed under natural conditions are not known. Uptake from water and accumulation in fish is dependent on the chemical structure of the product. Their acute toxicity to mammals is considered low but very little is known concerning their chronic toxicity. Symptoms of toxic effects in exposed fish, however, have been observed.

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