Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Hamburger Connection: How Central America's Forests Become North America's Hamburgers

Norman Myers
Ambio
Vol. 10, No. 1 (1981), pp. 2-8
Published by: Springer on behalf of Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4312621
Page Count: 7
  • Download ($43.95)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Preview not available
Preview not available

Abstract

The growing demand for beef in the US is by far the major factor in the destruction of Central American rainforests. Forests are converted to pasture lands to support cattle, but the beef is exported to the US where it serves as a non-inflationary source of meat for the fast-food trade, notably the hamburger chains. The 'cheap' price of this beef does not reflect the total costs of production, especially the environmental costs involved in the destruction of some of the most diverse ecosystems in the entire tropical biome, including exceptional concentrations of species. The destruction of the forests clearly illustrates the connection between consumerist lifestyles in North America and environmental impoverishment in Central America.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[2]
    [2]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8