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The Role of Ozone in Forest Damage in West Germany

Mike Ashmore, Nigel Bell and Jack Rutter
Ambio
Vol. 14, No. 2 (1985), pp. 81-87
Published by: Springer on behalf of Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4313115
Page Count: 7
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Abstract

A new kind of forest damage has increased rapidly in range and severity in West Germany over the past ten years. There is considerable circumstantial evidence that ozone may be a contributing factor in this damage. Ozone concentrations in central Europe have increased over the past 30 years and the concentrations now recorded at rural mountain sites in Germany are similar to those recorded in areas of the United States, where ozone is known to cause forest damage, and above those which have been shown to damage sensitive tree species in fumigation experiments. However, there is, as yet, little direct experimental evidence relating to the species affected in Germany and until this is available it is impossible to assess the importance of the contribution of ozone in causing forest damage.

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