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Adolfo Wildt tra innovazione e tradizione: la scultura monumentale

Linda De Gobbis
Arte Lombarda
Nuova serie, No. 113/115 (2-4) (1995), pp. 147-153
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43132372
Page Count: 7
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Adolfo Wildt tra innovazione e tradizione: la scultura monumentale
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Abstract

The author examines the commemorative monumental works by Wildt between 1920 and 1930, and presents a little-studied aspect of his artistic activity as a sculptor. After analyzing two entirely sculptural monuments to the war dead that Wildt designed and completed for Appiano and Valduggia - two works which show the originality of his iconography and the boldness of his technique - the author examines his monumental sculptures to the war dead in Bolzano and Milan and the monumental sculpture for the Casa Madre dell'Associazione Mutilati e Invalidi in Rome. These monumental works are included in the debate on the destination and forms of celebratory art which had its beginnings in specialized journals following the ideas of artists and intellectuals like Carrà and Ojetti, and which assumed a more concrete form in monumental undertakings in Rome, Bolzano and Milan. The study concludes with an analysis of the statue of St. Ambrose on the monument to the war dead in Milan. The monument is an eclectic synthesis of Pierfrancescan iconography and references to the late Milanese Renaissance. Here, Wildt re-affirmed his own alternative position with respect to the choices - all Tuscanizing - of the sculptors of the twentieth century.

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