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Onorio Longhi e gli anni dell'esilio (1606-1611): le esperienze di un architetto romano nella Lombardia federiciana

Anna Bortolozzi
Arte Lombarda
Nuova serie, No. 151 (3) (2007), pp. 42-59
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43132799
Page Count: 18
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Onorio Longhi e gli anni dell'esilio (1606-1611): le esperienze di un architetto romano nella Lombardia federiciana
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Abstract

Onorio Longhi, Roman architect of Lombard origins, was forced to abandon the papal city in the summer of 1606 so that he would not be convicted for his involvement in the murder of Ranuccio Tomassoni, who had been killed by his friend Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio. Longhi decided to take refuge in his native town of Viggiù, where his family not only owned property and other possessions, but also had solid professional relations. For the next five years, until his definitive return to Rome in April of 1611, Onorio Longhi did his job as architect both in the area he came from, for the church dedicated to the birth of the Virgin in Viggiù and the church of Santi Nazaro e Celso in Arzo, as well as in the rest of Lombardy. From June of 1607 his relationship with Cristóbal Lechuga, general of artillery and superintendent of the fortresses of the Duchy of Milan, is documented. Longhi held various positions under Lechuga, working on the construction of the Forte di Fuentes and on the navigable canal that was supposed to connect Milan to Pavia. At the same time, it turns out that Longhi was involved in some of the major building sites of the time, furnishing drawings for the façade of the Cathedral in Milan and for Sant'Alessandro in Zebedia, and taking part in debates about the projects for the Duomo Nuovo in Brescia. His collaboration in these building sites with the architects Lorenzo Binago and Francesco Maria Richino contributed, through experimentation with various compositional innovations in the façades of the ecclesiastical buildings, to contamination between Roman and Lombard architectural language in the formative years of the Baroque. The Lombard experience was just as important for Longhi s later career: in the autumn of 1611, in fact, Cardinal Paolo Camillo Sfondrati entrusted him with the construction of the new church of the Lombards in Rome, which was dedicated to St. Charles Borromeo. Moreover, in 1612, he presented the designs for the tabernacle of Santa Maria presso San Celso in Milan.

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