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Redevelopment of a Degrading Forest System

Gordon L. Baskerville
Ambio
Vol. 17, No. 5 (1988), pp. 314-322
Published by: Springer on behalf of Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4313487
Page Count: 9
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Redevelopment of a Degrading Forest System
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Abstract

Implications of long-term resource exploitation in an eastern Canadian forest are examined. Resource use was strongly conditioned by the opportunity for society to achieve social benefits at no apparent cost of maintaining the publicly owned forest. Final realization that continued use of the resource for social development was imperiled, has led society to initiate management in the forest it owns. Redevelopment of the forest is complicated because the society which mandated the degradation wishes to continue receiving benefits from the resource. Controlled management of a forest imposes costs which reduce the flow of benefits available to society, and the implementation of management also constrains the way society uses the forest. While technical aspects of redeveloping the forest are straightforward, the social implications of the costs and constraints lead to conflict in the initiation of redevelopment. The technical design and implementation of redevelopment must account for the social conflicts if management is to be successfully introduced.

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