Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Lead in the Biosphere: Recent Trends

Donald R. Smith and A. Russell Flegal
Ambio
Vol. 24, No. 1 (Feb., 1995), pp. 21-23
Published by: Springer on behalf of Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4314280
Page Count: 3
  • Get Access
  • Download ($43.95)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Lead in the Biosphere: Recent Trends
Preview not available

Abstract

Regulation of some lead-containing products (e.g., gasoline additives, paint, solder) has reduced some emissions of lead to the environment. This is reflected in reduced aerosol lead concentrations and fallout in both urban and remote regions. It is also evidenced by recent declines in median blood lead (PbB) levels in the US and several European countries. However, those declines in PbB levels are small relative to the estimated natural PbB level in humans (0.016 μg ${\rm dL}^{-1}$ or 0.8 nmol L-1), and further reductions will be increasingly difficult to achieve because of globally elevated environmental sources of exposure (e.g., food, water, soil, dust). Moreover, despite local changes in lead use and emission patterns, trends over the past decade indicate that national (US) and international lead consumption is not declining. Therefore, international lead use and exposure-control programs are necessary to further reduce global lead poisoning.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23