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Miombo Trees: Ecological Strategies, Silviculture and Management

Esron Munyanziza and Roelof A. A. Oldeman
Ambio
Vol. 25, No. 7 (Nov., 1996), pp. 454-458
Published by: Springer on behalf of Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4314517
Page Count: 5
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Abstract

The main miombo trees in Morogoro, Tanzania, were studied in the nursery and in the field to determine the ecological strategies by which they survive in the miombo woodland, i.e. in a hostile climate, bush fires and low soil fertility. Aspects studied included seed production, seed germination, nursery techniques, symbiosis and seedling growth characteristics. Miombo trees are known to produce huge amounts of seeds germinating immediately in most species studied, or have dormancy arresting germination until conditions are favorable. The tree's big seeds feed the seedlings in the initial establishment process. Miombo seedlings develop a strong taproot as a sure source of food and energy. Pruning this taproot proved to negatively affect seedling growth. Miombo trees were shown to form ectomycorrhizae with a wide range of fungi. Seedlings are colonized before epigeal germination is completed. Many strategies interact in complex ways to ensure tree regeneration and survival.

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