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Energy Consumption and Acid Deposition in Northeast Asia

David G. Streets, Gregory R. Carmichael, Markus Amann and Richard L. Arndt
Ambio
Vol. 28, No. 2 (Mar., 1999), pp. 135-143
Published by: Springer on behalf of Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4314864
Page Count: 9
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Energy Consumption and Acid Deposition in Northeast Asia
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Abstract

Northeast Asia is one of the most dynamic and diverse regions of the world. Fueled by high population growth and vibrant economies, energy consumption is currently 12% of the world's total and projected to increase by a factor of 2 to 3 by 2030. Because fossil fuels will provide much of this energy, emissions of sulfur dioxide are projected to increase by about the same amount. Northeast China is the main emitting region, and sulfur is transported across the Korean peninsula to Japan and beyond. Acid deposition is evident today and will increase dramatically in the future. It is projected that severe damage to ecosystems will occur throughout the region without the introduction of emission controls. Abatement technology could cost USD 10-30 billion annually by 2030 and still provide only partial protection. There is an urgent need for regional cooperation to improve the level of scientific understanding and develop a basis for regionwide control strategies.

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