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A Qualitative Study of Individual and Peer Factors Related to Effective Nonviolent versus Aggressive Responses to Problem Situations among Adolescents with High Incidence Disabilities

Terri N. Sullivan, Sarah W. Helms, Amie F. Bettencourt, Kevin Sutherland, Geri M. Lotze, Sally Mays, Stephen Wright and Albert D. Farrell
Behavioral Disorders
Vol. 37, No. 3 (May 2012), pp. 163-178
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43153550
Page Count: 16
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Qualitative Study of Individual and Peer Factors Related to Effective Nonviolent versus Aggressive Responses to Problem Situations among Adolescents with High Incidence Disabilities
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Abstract

To enhance the positive adjustment of youths with high incidence disabilities, a better understanding of the factors that influence their use of effective responses in challenging situations is needed. In this qualitative study, adolescents described individual and peer factors that would influence their use of effective nonviolent or aggressive responses. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 74 adolescents (61% boys) with high incidence disabilities (71% with a learning disability, 15% with an intellectual disability, and 14% with an emotional or behavioral disorder). Individual themes included values and beliefs, emotion regulation and problem-solving, positive self-image and confidence, perceived effectiveness of responses and potential consequences, and attributions about others or the situation. Peer factors included peer support, peer models for nonviolent responses, peer victimization, and protecting image, status, and reputation with peers. Identification of these themes has important implications for youth violence prevention efforts.

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