Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Understanding Chemical Change in Primary Education: The Effect of Two Cognitive Variables

Dimitrios Stamovlasis and George Papageorgiou
Journal of Science Teacher Education
Vol. 23, No. 2, Elementary Science Education (2012), pp. 177-197
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43156642
Page Count: 21
  • More info
  • Cite this Item
Understanding Chemical Change in Primary Education: The Effect of Two Cognitive Variables
Preview not available

Abstract

In this study, pupils' understanding of chemical change was investigated in relation to two cognitive variables: logical thinking and field-dependence/fieldindependence. The participants (N = 99) were sixth-grade elementary school pupils (aged 11/12), which were involved in two different tasks related to combustion. The pupils were tested for their understanding by means of an instrument, where they were asked to describe and interpret the phenomenon. The application of multiple regressions on students' mean achievement score along with analysis of variance demonstrated that the above variables were statistically significant predictors with logical thinking to be the most dominant one. Moreover, a distinction between items emphasizing description and items emphasizing interpretation were made and the effects of the cognitive variables were determined. Path analysis was implemented to depict these hypothesized direct and indirect effects among variables. The findings contribute to the literature by providing empirical evidence that the above individual differences have an effect on pupils' understanding the phenomenon of chemical change at that critical age. Implications for science education are also discussed and it is pointed out that cognitive variables, such as, logical thinking and field-dependence/field-independence should not be ignored in potential teaching interventions. Moreover, theoretical contribution is given by showing that neo-Piagetian theories provide a coherent framework for understanding students' performance in science education.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[177]
    [177]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
178
    178
  • Thumbnail: Page 
179
    179
  • Thumbnail: Page 
180
    180
  • Thumbnail: Page 
181
    181
  • Thumbnail: Page 
182
    182
  • Thumbnail: Page 
183
    183
  • Thumbnail: Page 
184
    184
  • Thumbnail: Page 
185
    185
  • Thumbnail: Page 
186
    186
  • Thumbnail: Page 
187
    187
  • Thumbnail: Page 
188
    188
  • Thumbnail: Page 
189
    189
  • Thumbnail: Page 
190
    190
  • Thumbnail: Page 
191
    191
  • Thumbnail: Page 
192
    192
  • Thumbnail: Page 
193
    193
  • Thumbnail: Page 
194
    194
  • Thumbnail: Page 
195
    195
  • Thumbnail: Page 
196
    196
  • Thumbnail: Page 
197
    197