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Les femmes algériennes rurales dans la politique de développement après l'indépendance

Marie-Aimée Hélie-Lucas
Labour, Capital and Society / Travail, capital et société
Vol. 18, No. 1 (April 1985/avril 1985), pp. 128-152
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43157694
Page Count: 25
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Les femmes algériennes rurales dans la politique de développement après l'indépendance
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Abstract

Self-management in agriculture has been the showcase of Algerian socialism. Soon after independence it had become clear that farms were not self-managed but state-owned, and that "socialism" was only "a good recipe for primitive accumulation of capital" (Damien Hélie, Industrial Self-Management in Algeria, 1967) where private capital was not yet able to take over. Women have been left out of this "modern sector" and out of the "Agrarian Revolution" which pretended to restructure the "traditional sector" of small private properties. In fact, they hardly exist, statistically speaking, either as "self-managers," or "beneficiaries" of the Agrarian Revolution, or "cooperators". More than that, they tend to disappear from the official national statistics even as agricultural labour in the "traditional sector". The Algerian government as "socialist" ignores use value to the benefit of exchange value and strictly defines "work" as wage-earning; this excludes the majority of rural people and the quasi totality of women from "development". In addition, the government applies its "specific socialism", i.e. the "arab-Islamic values," by dissolving women within the family, veiling their existence, their work and their rights.

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