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LE COMMISSIONI PERMANENTI DELLA CAMERA DEI DEPUTATI

Elio Rogati Valentini
Il Politico
Vol. 35, No. 3 (SETTEMBRE 1970), pp. 511-537
Published by: Rubbettino Editore
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43210170
Page Count: 27
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LE COMMISSIONI PERMANENTI DELLA CAMERA DEI DEPUTATI
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Abstract

The Italian Parliament is composed of two Houses: Chamber of Deputies and Senate. Each House carries out her legislative work and political contrai on the Government through a central organ, which is the Assembly of the Whole House, and some collateral organs, which are the standing Committees, whose members are less numerous than in the Assembly. In every standing Committee the different parliamentary Groups, that is to say the political parties, are represented in the same proportion as in the Assembly. The standing Committees, whose competence is fixed, are born in Italy in 1920. Italian system is very different from others countries, because our standing Committees have a legislative power, i.e. the power of voting and passing a bill definitely; this power does not belong to the Committees of other Parliaments. This Italian important innovation, which semplifies the legislative work of the Parliament, was introduced in 1939 and consecrated in the Republican Constitution of 1948. The standing Committees carry out their activity in five different ways, we call « sedi »: 1) « sede referente », when the Committee examines a bill preliminarily and later send it to the Assembly for final discussion and vote; 2) « sede legislativa », when the Committee examines and passes the bill definitely; 3) « sede redigente », when the Committee, on behalf of the Assembly, starts a new formulation of the articles of a bill, which later will be passed by the Assembly without modification; 4) « sede consultiva », when the Committee expresses his opinion on a bill discussed in another Committee; 5) « sede politica », when the Committee debates a political problem with a member of Government, or hears others persons (hearings). A great power has the President of each standing Committee, in order to convene a meeting and indicate the problems to be discussed. Press and people cannot be present to the meetings of the standing Committees. This secrecy makes easier the work of the Deputies. The Italian system of the standing Committees is a good one. Anyway we hope that the power of the Committees will be increased in order to modernize the Parliament's work and help the Government, too.

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