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Review: Should Moore Have Followed His Own Method?

Reviewed Work: Philosophical Analysis in the Twentieth Century, Volume 1, The Dawn of Analysis by Scott Soames
Review by: Daniel Stoljar
Philosophical Studies: An International Journal for Philosophy in the Analytic Tradition
Vol. 129, No. 3 (Jun., 2006), pp. 609-618
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4321777
Page Count: 10
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Should Moore Have Followed His Own Method?
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Abstract

I discuss Soames's proposal that Moore could have avoided a central problem in his moral philosophy if he had utilized a method he himself pioneered in epistemology. The problem in Moore's moral philossophy concerns what it is for a moral claim to be self-evident. The method in Moore's epistemology concerns not denying the obvious. In view of the distance between something's being self-evident and its being obvious, it is suggested that Soames's proposal is mistaken.

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