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L'ODYSSÉE RELIGIEUSE DE VASILIJ GRIGOROVIČ BARSKIJ À TRAVERS LES CHRÉTIENTÉS LATINE ET GRECQUE (1723-1747)

PIERRE GONNEAU
Revue des études slaves
Vol. 70, No. 2, LA CHRÉTIENTÉ LATINE ET LES SLAVES ORIENTAUX (1998), pp. 399-409
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43271107
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
L'ODYSSÉE RELIGIEUSE DE VASILIJ GRIGOROVIČ BARSKIJ À TRAVERS LES CHRÉTIENTÉS LATINE ET GRECQUE (1723-1747)
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Abstract

Relating his pilgrimages through Poland, Hungary, Austria, Italy, the Greek islands, Mount Athos and the Near East, the Kievan Vasilij Barskij devotes a great deal of attention to the confrontation between Latin and Greek faiths. His testimony is a contrasted one. It includes sympathetic descriptions of Western European mores and even of specifically Catholic supports of worship, such as sculptures or musical instruments. Meanwhile, Barskij denounces « Papist » expansionism in traditionally « Greek » fields and tells several tales of violence commited by Catholics against Orthodoxs. Neither does Barskij spare his criticisms to the rigorist monks of the Athos (most of them Serbians or Bulgarians) who doubt the Orthodoxy of the Ukrainian people coming to the Holy Mountain. Well aware of the cultural gap between his native land, under the rule of the powerful Russian sovereign, and the cradle of Orthodoxy, under Ottoman yoke, Vasilij experiences a mix of respect and condescension towards the Greek « great Church in captivity ». In the end, he elaborates a sort of climate theory, recognizing the validity of both Catholic and Orthodox faiths, within their ancestral boundaries.

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