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Journal Article

Outsourcing Border Security: NGO Involvement in the Monitoring, Processing and Assistance of Indonesian Nationals Returning Illegally by Sea

MICHELE FORD and LENORE LYONS
Contemporary Southeast Asia
Vol. 35, No. 2, Special Focus: New Actors in Maritime Security Governance in Southeast Asia (August 2013), pp. 215-234
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/43281251
Page Count: 20
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Outsourcing Border Security: NGO Involvement in the Monitoring, Processing and Assistance of Indonesian Nationals Returning Illegally by Sea
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Abstract

Since the signing of the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, the Straits of Malacca have been identified as a "hot spot" for whole range of maritime security threats, including human trafficking and people smuggling. As a consequence, Indonesia's national and local authorities have been under immense pressure from the international community to develop and implement programmes that address these concerns. Multilateral agencies and other donor organizations have also pumped millions of dollars into counter-trafficking and anti-smuggling programmes in the Riau Islands. Much of the groundwork for both government and international initiatives is done by NGOs, most of which work to identify and assist repatriated migrant workers or victims of trafficking. In one case, however, a Batam-based NGO has gone far beyond this well-trodden path, developing a system to apprehend undocumented migrants who use the services of people smugglers to return to without passing through immigration. This article examines the case of Gerakan Anti-Trafficking (Anti-Trafftcking Movement, GAT) implications for our understanding of emerging modes of non-involvement in border regulation.

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