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Journal Article

Can Islamists Be Democrats? The Case of Jordan

Glenn E. Robinson
Middle East Journal
Vol. 51, No. 3 (Summer, 1997), pp. 373-387
Published by: Middle East Institute
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4329086
Page Count: 15
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Can Islamists Be Democrats? The Case of Jordan
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Abstract

In contradistinction to the usual arguments about Islamist movements being the greatest threat to democratic transitions in the Middle East, the argument below posits that the Islamist movement in Jordan has been a force for democratic expansion since liberalization began there in 1989. It has been so primarily because greater democratization has served its organizational interests. As the best-organized political movement in Jordan, the Muslim Brothers have had the greatest interest in easing political restrictions that hindered the pursuit of their various policy goals.

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