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Al-Azhar: Between the Government and the Islamists

Steven Barraclough
Middle East Journal
Vol. 52, No. 2 (Spring, 1998), pp. 236-249
Published by: Middle East Institute
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4329188
Page Count: 14
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Al-Azhar: Between the Government and the Islamists
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Abstract

Since Husni Mubarak assumed the presidency in 1981, the Egyptian government has transferred significant administrative duties to Al-Azhar in order to demonstrate its Islamic credentials. For its part, the ancient Muslim institution of higher learning has used these powers to push its own agenda and lever for an even greater role in decision making. Al-Azhar has emerged as a power in its own right, delicately placed between the government and the Islamist opposition.

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